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Original Research



A study of biochemical inflammatory marker of TNF-alpha in hypothyroidism patients

Bijay Kumar Mahaseth, Arun Mishra, Dhiraj Mahaseth, Chandana Bera, Ashish Kumar Sharma.




Abstract

Background: Deranged thyroid function may be caused by autoimmune disorders like auto-immune thyroiditis. The medical staging of the disease shows an extensive display of symptoms like overt hypothyroidism. Various scientific studies had shown that auto-immune thyroiditis may be due to the interaction of cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-alpha – TNF-α). Current studies had shown that TNF-α plays a crucial role in the regulation of thyroid transcription factors.

Aims and Objectives: The study aimed to assess the comparative changes of inflammatory markers in diagnosed thyroid patients and control subjects.

Materials and Methods: The present study comprises 200 subjects of both sexes whom 00 are healthy controls and 100 are clinically confirmed cases of hypothyroidism, with an age group ranging from 25 to 70 years. Serum TNF-α and serum thyroid stimulating hormone were estimated by ELISA Method.

Results: The inflammatory marker (Serum TNF-α) was significantly (P > 0.05) raised in clinically diagnosed hypothyroid patients (4.09 ± 0.94) as compared to age and gender match healthy control subjects (3.06 ± 0.55).

Conclusion: Many studies have shown that inflammatory markers are the primary cause of thyroid function problems. The current cogitation proved that raised serum TNF-α is concerned with the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid destruction. It seems that TNF-α is highly significant in the case of Hypothyroidism.

Key words: Hypothyroidism; Tumor Necrosis Factor-α; Thyroid Stimulating Hormone






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