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Seroprevalence of Brucellosis among Patients Attending a Teaching Hospital in Southern Saudi Arabia

Shafqat Qamer, Mohammed Sarosh Khan, Madiha Sattar Ansari, Sana M Kamal, Salahuddin Khan.

Abstract
Human brucellosis, also termed as Malta fever or Mediterranean fever, is prevalent globally having heavy repercussions in the form of reproductive losses and infertility, arthritis, mastitis, and severe pathologic lesions. This research aimed to analyze the seroprevalence of brucellosis in Alkharj region of Saudi Arabia and identify significant risk factors and their impact on prevalence of brucellosis in patients of the region. This research was however confined to investigating the seroprevalence of human brucellosis in such patients that complained prolonged fever. The study used a cross-sectional survey method to identify patients complaining Pyrexia of Unknown Origin (PUO) with tested and proven presence of clinical characteristics of brucellosis. The results confirmed Brucellosis in 38/278(13.6 %) patients and a strong relationship was also observed between its prevalence and the risk factors such as direct contact with animal, consumption of raw milk and animal products. A proactive approach is required to sensitize people about human brucellosis and to exercise severe discipline. The study recommends introducing awareness programs among livestock community and highlight risk factors. Serological surveillance units may also be established at all district headquarters. In order to diagnose the disease at early stages, valid and reliable serological tests should be made readily available.

Key words: Human Brucellosis; risk factors; Alkharj; Saudi Arabia.






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The articles in Bibliomed are open access articles licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the work is properly cited.