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Original Research

RMJ. 2009; 34(2): 173-175


Hepatitis C, Myths and Awareness

Farhana yousuf. Gulfareen Haider, Ambreen Haider, Nasirudin Muhammad.

Abstract
Objective
To determine the awareness regarding hepatitis C infection among women attending an
obstetrics and gynecology clinic.
Methods
This descriptive study was conducted in the department of obstetric and gynecology of Liaquat
University of Medical and Health Sciences Hyderabad, Sindh from February 2 to August 3, 2008
and included 141 women of 20-50 years of age. Information was collected on predesigned
questionnaire containing questions regarding basic knowledge of disease, its causative organism,
route of transmission, misconceptions and its prevention. Informed consent was taken.
Results
Out of 141 women, 49 (34.7%) knew that it is major health problem in Pakistan. Only 39
(27.6%) had correct knowledge that it affects which part of body and similar number of women
said that they insist for new syringes when getting treatment from a doctor. 91 (64.5%) women
knew that it can be transmitted by sexual contact and 71 (50.3%) knew that it can be transmitted
by reused syringes, needle prick while only 29 (20.5%) women answered correctly regarding its
transmission through sharing razors/tooth brushes. 110 (78%) had misconception that diet
perhaiz is necessary .
2
Conclusion
This study found that the knowledge about hepatitis C virus among women was inadequate.
Majority of women also shared misconceptions that there is a specific diet recommended for
people with disease and that hepatitis C is a vaccine preventable disease. (Rawal Med J 2009;34:).

Key words: Women, awareness, hepatitis C, misconceptions, vaccine.






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