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Gross Morphological Studies on the Digestive System of Guinea Fowl (Numida meleagris)

Devendra Saran, Balwant Meshram, Hemant Joshi, Gajendra Singh, Shashi Kumar, Pratiksha Mishra.

Abstract
The gross anatomy of digestive system was performed in Guinea Fowl (Numida meleagris) birds. The digestive system was started at the beak which were observed ending at cloaca or vent. Beak (rostrum), tongue (lingua), salivary glands (glandulae ois), pharynx, esophagus, proventriculus, gizzard, small intestine, large intestine, colorectum and cloaca were observed as the sequential structural components of digestive system. The cervical and thoracic esophagus, combinedly has recorded 12.81% of total length of digestive system whereas proventriculus with gizzard, the combine has shown 2.40% of length to that of complete tubular digestive system. The total length of tubular component of digestive system has approximate 80% share to the intestines wherein the small intestine has contributed approximate 87% while 13% was the share of the large intestine. The right caecae was observed 6.38% larger than the left.

Key words: Gross Morphology, Morphometry, Digestive System, Guinea Fowl (Numida meleagris)



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