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Original Research

BMB. 2021; 6(4): 0-0


Does vitamin D affect beta cell activity?

Gülin Öztürk Özkan.


Abstract

Objective: The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency is ever-increasing throughout the world. Vitamin D deficiency is associated with disorders such as diabetes, insulin resistance, obesity, dyslipidemia and hypertension. This research study was carried out to assess serum vitamin D levels of patients with type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, obesity and impaired fasting glucose. Material and Methods: This study was carried out on 504 18–80-year-old patients with type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, obesity and impaired fasting glucose. Their fasting glucose, fasting insulin, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, triglyceride, 25(OH)D concentration, height and body weight measurements were analyzed retrospectively. Body mass index (BMI), HOMA-IR and HOMA B values of the patients were calculated. Results: It was found that 89.9% of the patients with type 2 diabetes, 90.6% of the insulin resistance patients, 91.7% of the obesity patients and 94.1% of the impaired fast glucose patients had less than 30 ng/mL of serum 25(OH)D concentration. It was seen that the serum 25(OH)D concentrations of the patients were negatively correlated with their fasting insulin concentrations and HOMA B values, and positively correlated with their HDL-cholesterol levels. Conclusion: Based on this study, vitamin D deficiency was found to be common in the patients with type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, obesity and impaired fasting glucose. Serum 25(OH)D concentrations were correlated with levels of fasting insulin, HDL-cholesterol and beta-cell function.

Key words: Vitamin D, type 2 diabetes, obesity, insulin resistance; HOMA-IR, HOMA B

Article Language: Turkish English






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