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SRP. 2021; 12(3): 84-87


The Effect Of Ketamine On Ventilator Isolation In Patients With Agitated Delirium In Comparison With Standard Care

Alireza Kamali, Behnam Mahmodiyeh, Seyed Mohammad Jamalian, Mohadeseh Esmaeili.


Abstract

Introduction: Agitated delirium causes more problems, especially in patients with mechanical ventilation, due to the increased risk of self extubation. Therefore, recognizing and introducing the delirium time-reducing drug in the treatment process of these patients will be very important.
Materials and Methods: This clinical trial study was performed on 64 patients undergoing ventilator with agitated delirium (RASS≥3) admitted to the intensive care unit of Valiasr Hospital in Arak. These patients were divided into two groups using a random number table. Patients in the ketamine group were given 1-2 mg/h of ketamine daily, and patients in the propofol group received propofol as an infusion. the Tnformation obtained from these patients was recorded in a checklist. Finally, this information was analyzed using SPSS 19.
Results: The mean age (SD) of the ketamine and propofol groups were 39.63 (12.65) and 41.09 (11.81), respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of age and gender. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of hemodynamic changes during the study period (P> 0.05). The mean (SD) duration of intubation in the ketamine and propofol groups was 82.72±8.73) and 179.81±8.46 hours, respectively (P

Key words: Ketamine, ventilator isolation, agitated delirium, standard care.






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