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A Prospective Randomized Control Trial to Study the Role of Intraperitoneal Irrigation with Normal Saline in Reduction of Postoperative Pain In Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

Pankaj Shivhare, Pankaj Dugg, Harnam Singh, Sushil Mittal, Ashwani Kumar.

Abstract
Aim: The study was performed to examine the effect of intraperitoneal irrigation with normal saline on postoperative abdominal and shoulder pain following laparoscopic cholecystectomy.
Methods: 60 patients with symptomatic gallstone disease undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomized in two groups. In study group A (n=30 patients) 30ml/kg of 0.9% normal saline was instilled at the gallbladder bed, while no intervention was performed on control group B (n=30).
Results: Abdominal pain was worst during the first 24 hours after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. At 6, 12 and 24 hrs, group A exhibited significantly less abdominal pain than group B. Group A also experienced less shoulder tip pain during the first postoperative day as compared to the control group.
Conclusion: Intraperitoneal irrigation with normal saline is effective in reducing postoperative abdominal and shoulder tip pain following laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

Key words: Cholecystectomy, laparoscopy, pneumoperitoneum, pain



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