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The Effect of Falciparum Malaria Infection on The Platelet Count of Children in a Tertiary Hospital in Uyo, Akwa Ibom State of Nigeria

Eno-Obong Edet Utuk, Enobong Emmanuel Ikpeme, Ifeoma Josephine Emodi, Etim Moses Essien.

Abstract
AIM: Malaria is a major cause of illness and deaths in children in Nygeria. The aim of this research on thrombocytopenic patterns in local communities is to improve awareness of this important complication of childhood malaria.
METHOD: The effect of p. falciparum malaria infection on the platelet count of one hundred and eighty children aged six months to fifteen years were compared with 180 healthy controls without malaria matched for age and gender. The platelet counts were evaluated using the automated analyser (Sysmex KX-21N).
RESULTS: The mean platelet count (x109/L) for subjects and controls were 297.40128.03 and 338.27103.89 respectively. The difference was statistically significant (p < 0.001). There was a lower mean platelet count in those with severe malaria, with an inverse relationship between the malaria parasite density and platelet count (r=-0.21; p

Key words: Plasmodium falciparum, Thrombocytopenia, Children, Nigeria.



Article Language: Turkish English



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