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Review Article

JCR. 2015; 2(1): 1-6


POTENTIAL MEDICINAL PLANTS FOR LYMPHATIC FILARIASIS: A REVIEW

SANTOSH KUMAR MAURYA, ANIL KUMAR SINGH, ANKIT SETH.

Abstract
Lymphatic filariasis (LF) is deemed to be a major health problem in tropical and subtropical countries. Adult worms may live for several years in the infected individual, producing microfilariae (mf) and thereby facilitating transmission of the disease through the vector mosquitoes. Filarial nematodes are responsible for several diseases which include elephantiasis, river blindness and tropical pulmonary eosinophilia. The drug of choice for controlling filariasis exhibits numerous side effects. Current strategies to control filariasis are not thought to be completely safe and successful. This warrants an effective and safe drug targeted against the adult filarial worm. Some lead has been made by researchers to investigate the effect of several medicinal plants on filarial worm and many of them have been reported to have antifilarial activity. This review presents the profiles of the plants as antifilarial agents which not only affect the target but should have very low or no side effects.

Key words: Lymphatic filariasis, Microfilariae, Antifilarial, Adult worms.


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