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Original Article

Med Arch. 2019; 73(4): 253-256


Smaller Pituitary Volumes in Patients with Delusional Disorder

Mehmet Gurkan Gurok, Denizhan Danaci Keles, Sevda Korkmaz, Hanefi Yildirim, Mehmet Caglar Kilic, Murad Atmaca.

Abstract
Introduction: Delusional disorder shares some clinical characteristics of OCD and hypochondriasis. Delusions compared to obsessions in the OCD and compared to bodily preoccupations in the hypochondriasis are more established beliefs. Aim: To measure pituitary volumes in patients with delusional disorder and hypothesized that volumes would be reduced in those patients by a mechanism that we could not account for before for patients with OCD and hypochondriasis. Methods: Eighteen patients with delusional disorder and healthy controls were included into the study. Pituitary gland volumes were measured. Results: When using independent t test, the mean total pituitary volume was 777.22±241.28 mm³ in healthy controls, while it was 532.11±125.65 mm³ in patients with delusional disorder. The differences in regard to pituitary gland volumes between patients with delusional disorder and healthy control subjects were statistically meaningful (p

Key words: Pituitary, delusional disorder, smaller, volumes


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