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Equijost. 2014; 2(1): 106-113


THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN GEOMAGNETIC STORM AND MONTHLY AVERAGE TEMPERATURE

Joshua B. W., Adamu B. I., Bonde D. S., Abbas M., Adebesin B. O, Adamu J. L..

Abstract
Recent studies have led to speculations that solar-terrestrial interaction, measured by sunspot number and geomagnetic activity usually plays an important role in global temperature change over the past centuries or so. This study takes this possibility as a hypothesis for testing in order to investigate the relationship between geomagnetic storm and monthly average temperature. Results from our study reveal that; 2005 is the most disturbed year followed by 2011, and the least disturbed is 2009. The maximum annual average temperature was recorded in 2009 and the minimum was observed in 2008. The monthly variability of the two parameters shows that the temperature increases before a minimum depression in the Dst was reached. The maximum temperature was observed majorly in the month of April throughout the period of study, while there is no specific month in which the minimum Dst value was consistently observed. The correlation coefficient (R) between mean monthly maximum temperature and Dst was observed to be 0.006083. This confirms that the increase in the mean maximum temperature does not depend on the occurrence of geomagnetic storm. This suggests that geomagnetic storm has no effect on global warming. Increase in solar activity leads to the increase in geomagnetic activity as well as the increase in amount of Ozone, which further shields the earth from global warming.

Key words: Geomagnetic storm; Temperature; Global warming; sunspot number; Sun; Solar wind; Dst



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