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Social Determinants to Nonmedical Prescription Drug Use among Multiracial Youth

Rebecca A Vidourek, Keith A King, Michael Brubaker.

Cited by (1)

Abstract
Background: The prevalence of Nonmedical prescription drug (NMPD) use, which is defined as using prescription drugs without a doctor’s prescription, is increasing among youth. The present study examined Nonmedical prescription drug (NMPD) use among Multiracial students in 7th through 12th grades. Method: A total of 2,134 students completed the PRIDE Questionnaire, which examines alcohol and drug use among youth. Results: A total of 14.8% of students reported using NMPDs in their lifetime. No significant differences were found based on sex. High school students were significantly more likely than junior high school students to use NMPDs. Results indicated that friends’ involvement in tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana was associated with significantly greater odds of lifetime Nonmedical prescription drug use. Involvement in risky behaviors also increased the odds of use. Conclusions: NMPD use is a significant issue among Multiracial youth. Specific prevention efforts should be implemented. Findings from this study may be used to develop prevention programs for Multiracial youth.

Key words: Nonmedical prescription drugs, students, Multiracial, risk behaviors, social determinants



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The articles in Bibliomed are open access articles licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the work is properly cited.
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