Home|Journals|Articles by Year Follow on Twitter| Subscribe to List

Directory for Medical Articles
 

Open Access

Original Article

PAFMJ. 2017; 67(4): 534-539


INTRATHECAL TRAMADOL AS AN ADJUVANT IN SUBARACHNOID BLOCK TO PROLONG THE DURATION OF ANALGESIA

Fahad Zahid, Humayun Munir Tarar, Muhammad Tariq, Hafsa Nazir, Irfan Zafar, Shahid Munir.

Abstract
Objective: To assess the effect of intrathecal tramadol added to bupivacaine to prolong the duration of analgesia in subarachnoid block for lower limb orthopedic surgeries.
Study Design: Randomized controlled trial.
Place and Duration of Study: Anesthesia department of Combined Military Hospital Sialkot, from Nov 2015 to Apr 2016.
Material and Methods: Patients were selected by non-probability consecutive sampling. One hundred and fifty patients from American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) I, II and III category fulfilling inclusion criteria undergoing various lower limb orthopedic surgeries were divided into two groups by lottery system. Group tramadol bupivacaine (TB) received 25mg (1 ml) of tramadol plus 2ml (10mg) of 0.5% bupivacaine while group bupivacaine alone (SB) received 1 ml normal saline plus 2ml (10mg) of 0.5% bupivacaine. Time to first analgesia request was noted as a measure of duration of analgesia. Time of onset of sensory block level and peak sensory block level and time to reach the peak sensory block level were also noted. Quality of anesthesia was compared among two groups. Data were analyzed by using SPSS version 22.
Results: Four patients were excluded from the study. The duration of anesthesia was effectively prolonged in group TB 181.56 ± 12.42 mins as compared to group SB 120.93 ± 15.54 mins. VAS score was significantly lower in group TB. Higher peak sensory block levels (T6) were achieved in group TB as compared to group SB. However time to reach the peak sensory block levels were significantly longer in group TB. (4.5 ± 0.47mins vs 3.09 ± 0.54 mins).
Conclusion: This study showed that intrathecal tramadol (25mg) can safely be used along with bupivacaine in subarachnoid blockade to prolong the duration of analgesia and improve the quality of anesthesia as well.

Key words: Bupivacaine, Intrathecal administration, Orthopedic procedures, Tramadol, Post operative analgesia


Full-text options

Full-text Article


Share this Article


Readers of this article also read the following articles
»Severe Obstetric Morbidity: Prevalence, Risk Factors and Outcome
»THREE PORTS LAPAROSCOPIC REPAIR OF ADULT MORGAGNI HERNIA AND RARE SIMULTANEOUS PRESENTATION OF PARA-ESOPHAGEAL HERNIA WITH MORGAGNI HERNIA
»Sport Injury Rehabilitation: Overall Perspective
»Characterization of chicken IgY produced against H5 and H9 avian influenza viruses
»Lipocalin-2 is an inflammatory biomarker associated with metabolic abnormalities in Egyptian obese children
»Trends and gender differences in alcohol and substance use among children and adolescents admitted to an addiction treatment center in Turkey: comparison of 2014 with 2011
»Association of Anorexia Nervosa with Depression
»Is detecting early onset of Alzheimer's disease is gaining a “new identity”? Olfactory dysfunction as an ERP Biomarker of Alzheimer’s disease.
»Effectiveness of Lumbar Mobilizations in Subjects with Osteoarthritis of Knee
»ACCURACY OF PREDICTIVE FACTORS AND FOCUSED ASSESSMENT WITH SONOGRAPHY FOR TRAUMA (FAST) IN MANAGEMENT OF ADULT BLUNT ABDOMINAL TRAUMA AND ITS OUTCOME
»Knowledge, attitude & practices about cervical cancer and screening among nursing staff in a teaching hospital



Advertisement
Journal of Molecular Pathophysiology

SUBMIT YOUR ARTICLE NOW




ScopeMed.com
BiblioMed Home
Follow ScopeMed on Twitter
Author Tools
eJPort Journal Hosting
About BiblioMed
License Information
Terms & Conditions
Privacy Policy
Contact Us

The articles in Bibliomed are open access articles licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the work is properly cited.
ScopeMed is a Database Service for Scientific Publications. Copyright © ScopeMed® Information Services.