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Gross and Pathomorphological Alterations of Infectious Bursal Disease Virus (IBDV) Infection and Its Localization by Indirect Immunoperoxidase in Broilers

Tanveer Dar, Shayaib Kamil, Umar Amin, Pervaiz Dar, Masood Mir, Zahid Amin Kashoo, Salik Nazki, Rayeesa Ali, Showkat Shah.

Abstract
The present research was undertaken to study the gross and pathomorphological alterations due to infectious bursal disease virus infection in broilers. A total of 29 outbreaks were recorded from Srinagar and adjoining districts during the study period. Out of the 29 recorded outbreaks, 22 (75.86%) were clinical outbreaks and the rest 7 (24.13%) were subclinical outbreaks. The average size of the affected flocks ranged between 2500 to 6000 birds. The affected birds were mostly between 17 and 35 days of age. Among the affected flocks morbidity varied from 30% to 60%, however mortality varied from 9 % to 25%. On postmortem examination the carcasses were found to be emaciated, dehydrated with darkened discoloration and presence of petechial and ecchymotic hemorrhages in thigh and breast muscles. Histopathological alterations mostly comprised of depletion of B- lymphocytes with RE cell hyperplasia. Indirect immunoperoxidase staining of the tissues revealed viral antigen in the form of coarsely brown deposits.

Key words: IBD, Bursa, IPT, RNA Virus, Lymphocytes


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