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Nerve muscle physiology changes with yoga in professional computer users

Vidya S Joshi.

Abstract
Background: Nerve muscle dysfunction is a common cause of occupational injuries collectively called as repetitive stress injury or musculoskeletal diseases adversely affecting the patients socially and economically. Yoga an ancient Hindu practice which combines body and mind relaxation techniques is finding the new interest of modern world due to its simple and natural technique and associated benefits.

Aims and Objectives: The objective of this study is to evaluate the objective changes associated with yoga in the nerve muscle physiology of professional computer users. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 study participants were randomly divided into a group that received yoga therapy and those who did not receive any intervention. Motor performance using handgrip strength (HGS) and endurance, median nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) and bimanual coordination were recorded before and after the intervention.

Results: HGS has increased in yoga with counseling group for both hands (statistically not significant). Yoga with counseling group has shown significant improvement in right MNCV as compared to counseling (P < 0.006). The participants of yoga with counseling group have shown a significant decrease in error during bimanual coordination (P = 0.003), and efficiency index has shown a trend toward improvement.

Conclusion: This study showed yoga improves neuromuscular physiology in computer-related musculoskeletal disorders.

Key words: Yoga; Computer Users; Occupational Diseases; Handgrip Strength; Nerve Conduction Velocity; Bimanual Coordination



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