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RMJ. 2021; 46(3): 576-579


Comparative effectiveness of pectoralis minor stretching and rhomboids strengthening on resting position of scapula in healthy persons with rounded shoulder posture

Ayesha Majeed, Shoaib Kayani, Saima Riaz, Muhammad Mudassar Yasin, Arva Naeem, Syeda Rafia Mansoor.

Abstract
Objective: To find and compare effects of pectoralis minor stretching and rhomboids strengthening in management of rounded shoulder posture (RSP).
Methodology: This randomized trial was conducted by recruiting 32 asymptomatic healthy individuals having RSP using convenience sampling technique. Participants were randomly divided into two groups. Group A received pectoralis minor stretching only and group B received pectoralis minor stretching along with rhomboids strengthening training. Both groups received total of 6 sessions, 2 sessions per week for 3 weeks. Assessment was done using Total scapular distance (TSD) and Normalized scapular abduction ratio (NSA ratio) before treatment, after 1st, 2nd & 3rd weeks of rehabilitation. SPSS v.20 was used for statistical analysis.
Results: Mean age in group A was 26.802.17 and in group B was 25.531.18. Within the group analysis using repeated measure ANOVA revealed both techniques to be effective in reducing total scapular distance and Normalized scapular abduction ratio (p0.05).
Conclusion: Pectoralis minor stretching alone and pectoralis minor stretching along with rhomboids strengthening both were equally effective techniques for management of RSP.

Key words: Physical therapy, posture, muscle stretching exercises, strengthening program, pectoralis muscle, rounded shoulder posture.






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The articles in Bibliomed are open access articles licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the work is properly cited.