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Comparative study of analgesic activity of Lagenaria siceraria root extract with pentazocine in albino mice

Kunjumon Dayana, Megaravalli R Manasa.


Abstract

Background: Medicinal plants have been the source of innumerable drugs. Opioids derived from plants are commonly used analgesics. However, they are associated with side effects ranging from vomiting, constipation to tolerance, and dependence. Hence, the search for safe and efficacious analgesic is on-going.

Aims and Objectives: The aim of the study was to assess the analgesic potential of the ethanolic extract of L. siceraria roots (EELSR) in albino mice by radiant heat method and to compare it with pentazocine.

Materials and Methods: Albino mice were divided into four groups randomly. Group 1 was given saline (0.1 mg/kg) orally (control). Group 2 was injected pentazocine 4 mg/kg (standard) intraperitoneally. Groups 3 and 4 were test groups and were administered EELSR 100 mg/kg BW and 200 mg/kg BW orally, respectively. Radiant heat method was used to screen for analgesic potential.

Results: Our study demonstrated the steady increase in reaction time in the test groups which received EELSR at both the doses. Maximum analgesic activity was observed at 60 min. EELSR has good analgesic activity in comparison with control. However, pentazocine has significantly better activity than EELSR at both the doses. EELSR at 200 mg/kg BW has comparable analgesic activity to pentazocine only at 15 min.

Conclusion: The EELSR has analgesic potential, but pentazocine is more potent analgesic than EELSR.

Key words: Lagenaria siceraria; Mice; Radiant Heat; Pentazocine; Analgesic






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