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Original Research

Nig. Vet. J.. 2016; 37(4): -


AVIAN INFLUENZA, GUMBORO AND NEWCASTLE DISEASE ANTIBODIES AND ANTIGENS IN APPARENTLY HEALTHY WILD BIRDS IN KANO METROPOLIS, NIGERIA.

Haruna Usman Adamu, Arhyel Gana Balami, Paul Ayuba Abdu.

Abstract
A survey was conducted to assess the prevalence of avian influenza (AI), infectious bursal disease (IBD) (Gumboro), Newcastle disease (ND) antibodies and AI virus (AIV) antigens in some wild birds sold in Sabon gari live bird market in Kano Metropolis. One hundred and ninety five wild birds consisting of 50 intermediate egrets (Mesophoyx intermedius), 49 buffalo weavers (Bubalornis albirostris), 46 laughing doves (Streptopelia senegalensis) and 50 speckled pigeons (Columba guinea) were sampled. About 0.5 2 ml of blood was collected from each wild bird through its wing vein and processed to obtain serum that was screened for antibodies to AI and IBD using enzyme linked-immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and ND using haemaagglutination inhibition (HI) test. Oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs were also collected and screened for antigen to AIV using ELISA. An overall IBD and ND seroprevalence of 6.15%, and 10.76% was observed respectively, and an overall prevalence of 1.96% was found for AI antigen. The presence of antibodies to ND in all wild bird sampled; IBD in buffalo weavers, speckled pigeons and laughing doves and AIV in speckled pigeons suggest that these birds are susceptible to infection by ND, IBD and AI viruses and could transmit these viruses to commercial and rural poultry.

Key words: Avian influenza, Infectious bursal disease, Newcastle disease, Wild birds,Live wild bird market



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