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Creation of Pneumoperitoneum by a new technique prior to Laparoscopic procedure

Atta Hussain Soomro..

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the safe and easy technique for establishing the pneumoperitoneum, which best suits to our needs and compare it with other available techniques. DESIGN: A descriptive study SETTING: This study was conducted in Larkana, Sindh from February 2002 to July 2003. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 376 patients underwent different laparoscopic procedures. The pneumoperitoneum was created with veress needle in 80 patients, open technique was used in 20 patients while in the remaining 276 patients a new technique was used. RESULTS: The time used for creation of pneumoperitoneum with veress needle was 5 minutes, by open method 8 minutes and by new technique only one minute and 30 seconds. The rate of complications with veress needle was 1.25% (one patient), with open technique 10% (two patients) and with new method only 0.724% (two patients). All the complications were minor injuries to omentum or mesentry or serosa of the small bowel which did not require any treatment or repair. CONCLUSION: The advantages seen by this new technique are; easy to perform, less time consuming, safe with minimum possible complications and do not requiring any additional cost. It is recommended as a best available method for insufflation in laparoscopy, particularly suitable to our needs.

Key words: Laparoscopy. Insufflation. Digestive System Surgical Procedures. Pneumoperitoneum, Artificial. Abdomen. Adrenalectomy. Surgical Instruments. Needs. Gynecologic Surgical Procedures.






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The articles in Bibliomed are open access articles licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the work is properly cited.