Home|Journals|Articles by Year

Directory for Medical Articles
 

Original Research

Nig. Vet. J.. 2016; 37(4): 10-10


IMMUNOMODULATORY EFFECT OF LEVAMISOLE HYDROCHLORIDE AND MENTOFIN® IN NEWCASTLE DISEASE VACCINATED COMMERCIAL BROILERS

OLUWASEUN OLANREWAJU ESAN, ADEBAYO EHINMOWO, JOHN OLUSOJI ABIOLA, ADEBOWALE IDRIS ADEBIYI, OMOLADE ABODUNRIN OLADELE.


Abstract

Newcastle disease (ND) outbreaks have been reported in vaccinated poultry flocks in Nigeria and this highlight the need for administration of immunostimulants to improve immunity in such birds. The immunomodulatory effects of Mentofin® (a recent introduction into Nigeria) and Levamisole on antibody response of vaccinated chicks against ND were assessed. One hundred day-old chicks were randomly divided into five groups (A-E). Group A: unvaccinated; B, C, D and E: were administered LaSota vaccine at 14 and 42 days old. In addition, group C received Levamisole, group D received Mentofin® and group E, received a combination of Levamisole and Mentofin® orally for 3 days consecutively post-vaccinations. Blood samples were then collected from each group. ND virus antibody titers were determined using ELISA. Maternal antibody titre (76.55±2.35) at day-old declined at 56 day-old (3.83±0.3-7) in group A. At 14 days post primary vaccination, peak antibody titres in groups C, D and E (62.3±4.51, 60.2±3.84 and 64.9±5.58) were significantly higher than that of group B (42.3±4.28). Also, at 14 days post-secondary vaccination, peak titre in group E (77.9±3.14) was significantly higher than in groups A, B, C and D (3.83±0.37, 44.0±3.20, 71.1±3.48 and 70.3±3.25). This study shows that oral administration of Mentofin® and Levamisole significantly enhanced humoral response to live ND vaccination and their combination has a synergistic effect.

Key words: Levamisole,Mentofin, Broiler, Antibody response, Newcastle disease vaccination.






Full-text options


Share this Article



Online Article Submission
• ejmanager.com







eJManager.com
Review(er)s Central
About BiblioMed
License Information
Terms & Conditions
Privacy Policy
Contact Us

The articles in Bibliomed are open access articles licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the work is properly cited.