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Original Research

Dusunen Adam. 2017; 30(1): 32-38


Validity and Reliability of the Turkish version of DSM-5 “Severity of Acute Stress Symptoms—Child Age 11–17” Form

Sermin Yalin Sapmaz, Handan Ozek Erkuran, Dilek Ergin, Nesrin Sen Celasin, Duygu Karaarslan, Masum Ozturk, Ertugrul Koroglu, Omer Aydemir.




Abstract

Objective: This study aimed to assess the validity and reliability of the Turkish version of DSM-5 “Severity of Acute Stress Symptoms—Child Age 11–17” Form.
Method: The scale was prepared by carrying out the translation and back- translation of DSM-5 “Severity of Acute Stress Symptoms—Child Age 11–17” Form. Study group consisted of 30 patients that have been treated in a child psychiatry clinic and diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder and 40 healthy volunteers that attended middle or high school at the study period. For the assessment, Child Posttraumatic Stress Reaction Index was also used along with DSM-5 “Severity of Acute Stress Symptoms—Child Age 11–17” Form
Results: Regarding reliability analyses, Cronbach alpha coefficient for internal consistency was calculated as 0.918 while item- total score correlation coefficients ranged 0.595-0.837. Test-retest correlation coefficient was calculated as r=0.651. Concerning construct validity, one factor that could explain 67.7% of the variance was obtained. With respect to concurrent validity, the scale showed a high correlation with Child Posttraumatic Stress Reaction Index.
Conclusion: It was concluded that Turkish version of DSM-5 “Severity of Acute Stress Symptoms—Child Age 11–17” Form could be used as a valid and reliable tool both in clinical practice and for research purposes.

Key words: DSM-5, reliability, Severity of Acute Stress Symptoms—Child Age 11–17, validity






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