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Original Article

PAFMJ. 2015; 65(0): S231-S235


COMPARISON OF CRYSTALLOID PRELOADING AND CRYSTALLOID CO-LOADING FOR PREVENTION OF SPINAL ANESTHESIA INDUCED HYPOTENSION

Syed Ali Raza Ali Shah, Amjad Iqbal*, Syeda Sarah Naqvi.

Abstract
ABSTRACT
Objective: Comparison of crystalloid preloading and crystalloid coloading for prevention of spinal anesthesia induced hypotension in lower section cesarean section.
Study Design: Randomized controlled trial.
Place and Duration of Study: Main operation theatre, Combined Military Hospital (CMH) Rawalakot, over a period of 5 months from Sep 2013 to Feb 2014.
Material and Methods: 100 patients were divided into two groups. Each consisted of 50 patients. Group A was preloaded with crystalloid (Ringerís lactate) and group B was coloaded with crystalloid in same dose. blood pressure (B.P) was recorded thrice before induction of spinal anesthesia, and mean was noted for MAP. After induction of anesthesia, B.P was recorded at 3 minutes and 5 minutes. Reduction of 20% from the baseline MAP was taken as hypotension.
Results: At 3 minutes, hypotension was present in 35 patients (70%) in group A and 42 patients (84%) in group B (p=0.096). At 5 minutes, total number of patients who developed hypotension in group A was 38 (76%); and group B was 43 (86%) (p= 0.202)
Conclusion: Coloading may be used instead of preloading in patients undergoing spinal anesthesia for prevention of hypotension.

Key words: Coloading, Crystalloid, Hypotension, Preloading, Spinal anesthesia.



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