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Diagnostic and Therapeutic Strategies in Denture Removal After Ingestion in A Developing and Emerging Country – Nigeria

Paul Oserhemhen Adobamen, Johnson Ediale.

Abstract
Objective: Impaction of dentures in the esophagus with the associated complications is occasionally encountered in Ear, Nose, Throat, Head and Neck surgical practice. This article was aimed at highlighting the diagnostic and therapeutic strategies that aided successful removal.
Materials and Methods: It was a prospective observational study that was carried out at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Nigeria, between January 2009 and December 2010. All patients who ingested a denture during this period of study were recruited, and their demographic parameters, presenting features, duration of ingestion before presentation, surgical procedure, outcome, and associated complications obtained.
Results: Eight patients: 7 males and 1 female experienced denture ingestion during this period of study. Difficulty in swallowing and the ‘pointing sign’ were the main diagnostic symptoms and signs elicited respectively. The duration of ingestion before presentation at the hospital varied from 1 hour to 1 week, with complications associated with longer duration of presentation. Quick, tactical and highly specific rigid esophagoscopy procedures were important therapeutic strategies that led to successful removal of the ingested denture.
Conclusion: Difficulty in swallowing, the ‘pointing sign’ and tactical rigid esophagoscopy were the diagnostic and therapeutic strategies that aided denture removal from the esophagus.

Key words: Diagnostic, therapeutic, strategies, denture removal, esophagoscopy



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