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Natl J Med Res. 2015; 5(4): 305-308


Role of Chest Xray In Assessing the Severity In H1N1 Influenza Cases

Viral D. Panchal, Purvi Desai, Mahesh. K. Vadel.

Abstract
Introduction: Chest x-rays may play an important role in the diagnosis and treatment of H1N1 influenza by predicting which patients are likely to become sicker-who may be treated on out patient basis; who may need short duration of hospitalization; -who may need Intensive critical care viz. ventilator support Methodology: We retrospectively studied 130 patients with H1N1 influenza infection. The most common abnormality was consolidation in the lower zones (46/130) followed by multiple zonal involvement (41/130). Although a normal chest x-ray did not exclude the possibility of an adverse outcome, the study's findings can help physicians better identify high-risk H1N1 patients who require close monitoring. Result: The most common abnormality was consolidation in the lower zones (46/130) followed by multiple zonal involvement (41/130). On follow up 18 patients expired. Seropositive patients had predominant lower zone involvement While Patients with unizonal involvement has better outcome.

Key words: Swine Flu(H1N1), Symptoms, Chest Xray


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