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J Behav Health. 2015; 4(4): 97-100


Diet self-efficacy and physical self-concept of college students at risk for eating disorders

Leslie D Frazier, Joan A Vaccaro, Stephanie Garcia, Negar Fallahazad, Kapil Rathi, Alice Shrestha, Nancy Perez.

Cited by (2)

Abstract
Background: Both eating disorders and body image dissatisfaction affect a high proportion of college students. Self-esteem and self-efficacy may be protective factors for eating disorders. The aim of this study was to evaluate diet self-efficacy, the confidence to maintain or lose weight, and its association with physical self-concept using data from an online survey of health literacy, body image and eating disorders. Methods: This cross-sectional study collected online survey data from college student within the United States. The inclusion criteria allowed for 1612 college students, ages 17-35 years (597 males, 1015 females) belonging to the following racial/ethnic categories: Black (187); White, non-Hispanic (244), Hispanic (1035), and Other (146). Specifically, the study aimed to examine a) whether and to what degree diet self-efficacy and physical self-concept were associated with risk of eating disorders; b) the interaction of gender by ethnicity on diet self-efficacy, physical self-concept and risk of eating disorders; and, c) the relationship of diet self-esteem with physical self-description and body mass index in college students. Results: Negative dieting self-efficacy was associated with a lower score on physical self-concept [B = -0.52 (-0.90,-0.15), p = .007]. Males had a higher physical self-concept as compared to females [B = 14.0 (8.2, 19.8), p

Key words: dietary self-efficacy; physical self-concept; body image; eating disorders; college students


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