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Percutaneous Needle Aspiration Is A Minimally Invasive Method For A Breast Abscess

Hamid H. Sarhan, Osama M. Ibraheem.

Cited by (1)

Abstract
Background: Breast abscesses could be successfully treated by the percutaneous aspiration of pus and irrigation of the cavity with saline solution.
Objective: To assess the feasibility and effectiveness of percutaneous needle aspiration of breast abscesses under local anesthesia in the outpatient clinic.
Patients and methods: A prospective study of forty-three women with breast abscesses, who attended the outpatient clinic at the Tikrit teaching hospital and privit clinic for the period of January 2008 to January 2010. All patients had preliminary breast ultrasound examination. Percutaneous needle aspiration of pus under local anesthesia was done, followed by systemic antibiotics. Repeated aspiration was carried out later when deemed necessary and a follow-up by ultrasound was conducted.
Results: Twenty-three (53.4%) of the patients obtained complete resolution (no focal collection) after one aspiration; 9 (21%) required two aspirations and 8 (18.6%) required more than two aspirations for the cure (residual collection). In 3 (7%) of the patients, the treatment failed, where symptoms had not resolved after 3 days, with further pus collection despite aspiration and antibiotics, where surgical drainage was required.
Conclusions: Percutaneous needle drainage of breast abscesses after preliminary breast US is feasible as a primary and definitive treatment for breast abscesses, if complete or near complete drainage is achieved.

Key words: Breast, abscess, aspiration



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