Home|Journals Follow on Twitter| Subscribe to List

Directory for Medical Articles
 

Open Access

Original Article



A cross sectional study on reproductive health disorders in dairy cattle in Sudan

Amira Mohamed Elhassan, Mohamed Abdalla Fadol, Abdelgafar Mohamed Ali Elfahal, Abdel Rahim Mohamed El Hussein.

Abstract
A cross sectional survey was carried out in dairy farms in four States of Sudan to determine prevalence of reproductive health disorders that affect dairy cattle industries in the country. A total of 575 adult female cows in dairy farms located in Khartoum, Gezira, Sennar, and White Nile States were investigated using questionnaire survey and face-to-face interviews with the owners. The results indicated that 24.4% of the animals were affected with one or more reproductive health disorders. Abortion (57.1%) represented the major health problem affecting calf yield, followed by infertility (34.3%) and neonatal death (8.6%). Other health problems included stillbirth, vaginitis and retained placenta, anomalies, metritis and repeat breeder. Most of the abortion cases were detected during third trimester (76.25%) followed by first (12.5%) and second (11.25%) trimesters. Finally, countrywide investigations of reproductive disorders and increasing awareness to the owners are recommended for designing successful control strategies of reproductive disorders in Sudan.

Key words: Awareness, Dairy cattle, Reproductive disorders, Sudan



Share this Article


Advertisement
Journal of Apitherapy

SUBMIT YOUR ARTICLE NOW


ScopeMed.com
BiblioMed Home
Follow ScopeMed on Twitter
Author Tools
eJPort Journal Hosting
About BiblioMed
License Information
Terms & Conditions
Privacy Policy
Contact Us

The articles in Bibliomed are open access articles licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the work is properly cited.
ScopeMed is a Database Service for Scientific Publications. Copyright ScopeMed Information Services.