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Haematological indices & electrolyte status in sickle cell disease at rural hospital of central Maharashtra.

Ajay W Meshram, Priyanka A Bhatkulkar, Ruchir Khare, Komal Pazare.

Abstract
Background: Sickle cell disease is one of the most common autosomal recessive diseases in the world caused by a single nucleotide substitution (GTG - GAG) and is located at the sixth codon of the human-globin gene.

Aims & Objectives: This study was designed to determine the haematological values & electrolyte status that can be used in monitoring the status and management of sickle cell anaemia patients.

Materials and Methods: This study is an observational study done in 50 sickle cell patients in steady state, at Acharya Vinoba Bhave Rural Hospital, Sawangi Meghe, Wardha, Maharashtra, India. The complete blood counts (CBC) were analyzed using the Automated Coulter Counter & serum electrolytes estimated on ABL 800 Radiometer.

Results: Haemoglobin concentration and the MCV was significantly low (≤0.05) in sickle cell patients as compared to controls. TLC count was not significantly higher while platelets & red cell distribution width (RDW) were significantly higher (≤0.05) in sickle cell disease (SCD) patients, as compared to controls. The serum sodium concentration was low, while serum potassium level was high in patients of SCD.

Conclusion: Our study has explained haematological parameters & their role in sickle cell anaemia along with other biochemical parameters like electrolytes sodium & potassium which could be used in designing of the better management of sickle cell patients.

Key words: Sickle Cell Anaemia; Complete Blood Counts (CBC); Blood Indices; Serum Electrolytes



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