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JCBPR. 2019; 8(3): 147-154


The study of depression and anxiety symptoms in relation to interpersonal style and early maladaptive schemas

Betül Kırkıkoğlu, Volkan Koç.

Abstract
The existing literature provides support for the idea that early maladaptive schemas and interpersonal relationships may have an important effect on depression and anxiety complains? In line with these findings, it is aimed to examine the symptoms of depression and anxiety in relation to interpersonal style and early maladaptive schemas. The sample consists of 401 participants who were included through convenience sampling. Participants were assessed for their depression levels, anxiety levels, interpersonal styles, and early maladaptive schemas. For this purpose, Beck Depression Inventory, Beck Anxiety Inventory, Interpersonal Style Scale and Young Schema Scale Short Form-3 were used. According to the multiple regression analysis, interpersonal style and early maladaptive schemas separately predicted depression and anxiety symptoms and according to the hierarchical regression analysis, interpersonal style and maladaptive schemas predicted depression and anxiety symptoms together. But early maladaptive schemas are found to be the main predictor of both depression and anxiety symptoms. Finally, according to the result of the correlation analysis, it is found that there is a statistically significant relationship between all the four variables. The results were discussed considering the literature.

Key words: depression, anxiety, interpersonal communication, schemas



Article Language: Turkish English



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