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STUDY THE ANTIBACTERIAL EFFECT OF SOME ESSENTIAL OILS POTENTIATED WITH SELENIUM COMPOUNDS AGAINST SOME GASTROINTESTINAL-TRACT BACTERIA

Mohamed Ezz-Eldin Dawoud, Sherif El-nagdy, Doaa Gaith, Ahmed Abd-Elaal Hussein.


Abstract

In this study we aimed to assess the antibacterial activity of some essential oils potentiated with selenium compounds against some multi drug resistant gastrointestinal tract bacteria. A bacterial isolates of E.coli, Klebsiella spp, Proteus spp, Citrobacter spp, Salmonella spp and S.aureus were selected from Thirty three pure stool cultures on the basis of antibiotic resistance activity. Study performed in the laboratory of microbiology, Kasr El-Ainy, Faculty of medicine, Cairo University. Thirteen essential oils were tested for antibacterial effect against the selected isolates alone and in combination with antibiotics, Sod selenite compound (1% w/v). Results revealed that Cinnamomum verum had the greatest effect upon all isolates selected. The efficacy of used antibiotics increased when combined with effective essential oils. Sodium selenite had no any bacterial effect against all bacterial isolated individually or in combination with essential oils except for S.aureus isolate that was inhibited. Sodium selenite posses an additive effect towards essential oils of Cinnamomum verum, Syzygium aromaticum and Carum carviin combination against S.aureus. TEM scanning showed the disintegration of cell wall and plasma membrane lysis when treated with Cinnamomum verum.

Key words: Essential oils, Antibiotics, Enterobacterales, Selenium, Sodium selenite, Antibacterial effect, Potentiation, Antibiotic resistance, MDR bacteria, E.coli, Klebsiella spp, Proteus spp, Citrobacter spp, Salmonella spp, S.aureus.






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