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RMJ. 2011; 36(4): 259-261


Comparing the effectiveness of lumbar stabilization exercises with general spinal exercises in patients with postero-lateral disc herniation

Muhammad Naveed Babur,1 Danyal Ahmed,2 Farah Rashid3.

Abstract
Objective
To compare effectiveness of lumbar stabilization exercises (LSE) with general spinal exercises in patients with postero-lateral disc herniation.
Methods
In this study which was conducted at Physical Therapy Clinic National Hospital and Medical Center DHA, Lahore for a period of two months, 50 patients with postero-lateral disc herniation were divided in two groups; a Control group which underwent general spinal exercises (GSE) and an experimental group which underwent LSE. Both groups had regular physical therapy sessions consisting of heat, ultrasound and manual therapy. For 4 weeks, participants were taught and practiced either GSE or LSE.
The progress of the patients was measured on modified Oswestry scale, based on the subjective evaluation of the patients in their activities of daily life.
Results
Total disability post-test scores were lower in experimental group than control group.
Conclusion
Lumbar stabilization exercises are of better choice when compared with general spinal exercises in patients with postero lateral disc herniations. (Rawal Med J 2011;36:259-261).

Key words: Lumber herniation, low back pain, lumber stabilization.


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