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Research Article

JCDR. 2021; 12(4): 702-704


Usefulness of serum Cystatin C in comparison to serum creatinine as an early marker of acute renal disease- An Original Research

Dr. Vishal Bhargava,Dr.Krishana Gopal, Dr. Ram A Rawat, Dr.Richa Sijoria.


Abstract

Background: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is characterized by rapid decline in glomerular filtration rate (GFR).
Cystatin C is 13-kDa cysteine protease inhibitor that is produced by all nucleated cells at a constant rate. Hence;
the present study was conducted with the aim of assessing the usefulness of serum Cystatin C in comparison to
serum creatinine as an early marker of acute renal disease.
Materials & methods:100 healthy subjects and 100 AKI patients were enrolled. Information such as age,
gender, height, weight, comorbidities, personal history, drug history, presenting complaints and laboratory
investigationswas obtained. The serum cystatin C and serum creatinine values were measured simultaneously
and analysed. In the AKI study group, they were taken within 24 hours of onset of injury. All the results were
recorded and analysed by SPSS software.
Results:Mean Serum Cystatin C levels among the patients of the AKI group and the control group was 2.35
mg/dL and 0.91 mg/dL respectively.Mean Serum creatinine levels among the patients of the AKI group and the
control group was 1.97 mg/dL and 0.68 mg/dL respectively. Significant results were obtained while comparing
the mean serum Cystatin C levels and Serum creatinine levels among the patients of the study group and the
control group. Significant correlation of serum Cystatin C levels with AKI in comparison to serum creatinine
levels.
Conclusion: In comparison to serum creatinine, Serum cystatin C is a better marker of renal function in AKI
patients.

Key words: Cystatin C, Acute renal disease






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