Home|Journals|Articles by Year Follow on Twitter| Subscribe to List

Directory for Medical Articles
 

Open Access

Review Article

JCR. 2020; 7(4): 524-530


EFFECT OF DIFFERENT CURING REGIMES ON CAPILLARITY OF CONCRETE INCORPORATING LOCAL MATERIALS

Bengin M. A. Herki.

Abstract
This paper reports an experimental study to investigate the effect of different curing regimes on the capillary water absorption (CWA) characteristics of concrete produced with locally available materials. Mechanical (compressive strength) and nondestructive test (ultrasonic pulse velocity) of concrete were also investigated. The engineering properties were conducted on concrete under three different curing regimes at different curing times of 2, 7 and 28 days. The three different curing conditions were water curing, dry curing and gunny-covered curing. According to the results obtained concrete under water curing condition demonstrated lower capillary water absorption (CWA) at 2 and 7 days ages and concrete under gunny-covered condition demonstrated lower CWA at 28 days age compared with the other curing conditions. It is interesting to see that the compressive strength (38 MPa) of concrete was almost the same at 28 days age under gunny-covered and water curing conditions.

Key words: Capillary Water Absorption; Concrete; Materials; Strength; UPV


Full-text options

Full-text Article




Advertisement
Journal of Interdisciplinary Histopathology

SUBMIT YOUR ARTICLE NOW




ScopeMed.com
BiblioMed Home
Follow ScopeMed on Twitter
Author Tools
eJPort Journal Hosting
About BiblioMed
License Information
Terms & Conditions
Privacy Policy
Contact Us

The articles in Bibliomed are open access articles licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the work is properly cited.
ScopeMed is a Database Service for Scientific Publications. Copyright ScopeMed Information Services.